Vintage Theatre | deb flomberg
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Author: deb flomberg

Review by David Marlowe, 07/14 Craig Bond's direction of Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire" is outstanding! The intimacy of this Vintage Theatre production puts its audience in the hot, claustrophobic atmosphere of the Stanley Kowalski apartment in New Orleans.  Haley Johnson's portrayal of Blanche DuBois dazzles us with a poignant fragility that's destined to be ravaged by Kurt Brighton's brutish brother-in-law Stanley. Kelly Uhlenhopp is vibrant and robust as Blanche's more reality-based sister, Stella. This is classic Williams that's dark, serious drama that will rip your heart out! CLICK HERE to read the full review...

Review by Dave Perry, Aurora Sentinel It’s painful watching Robert Dubac wring out stand-up comedy and parables in the Book of Moron. You’ll laugh until it hurts. For almost 90 minutes, Dubac claims the stage and your complete attention with his one-man comedy show, barreling through history, religion, politics, psychology and as much offensive material as he can glean from the offenses people hurl at each other. Read the full review HERE. ...

Check out this review from our 2008 production of "A Streetcar Named Desire." This review, by David Marlowe, shows just how excited we are to have so many of the original cast returning for our upcoming production! David Marlowe: A Streetcar Named Desire Vintage Theatre: 8/22-9/21 It is thrilling to be able to report that “A Streetcar Named Desire” is exponentially better in all aspects than any previous production, which this reviewer has seen at Vintage. Haley Johnson is only twenty-three years old.  How then is it possible that she makes one feel more than most of the age appropriate women one has  seen play the role of Blanche DuBois?  Ms. Johnson is a superb actor.   Her incremental descent into madness is exquisitely delivered. Craig A. Bond has done yeoman’s work directing this play. Bond’s casting of Kurt Brighton as Stanley is a stroke of genius. Brighton is a balding muscular young man with just the right blend of arrogance and rage. Linda Williams gives us a strong reality-based Stella who accepts her World War II veteran husband and his rowdy carousing buddies with all their mental and emotional disabilities. Nick Kargel’s scenic design is a wonder. With it the artist gives us a fragmentary illusion of the Kowalskis’ squalid apartment. While the fragments are filled in with larger set pieces, the slats in the French shutters allow us to be privy to neighborhood occurrences outside as well as being able to see characters eavesdropping on those inside the apartment. Ray Berry’s sound design is exquisitely sensitive. The delicate music employed to give us the subjective reality of Blanche’s excruciating mental anguish is masterful. Bonnie MacLachlan’s costume design succeeds beautifully. The lighting by Jen Orf greatly enhances the production. Not to be missed....

3.5 STARS OUT OF 4 Review by Claire Martin From the Denver Post First, "The Book of Moron" has absolutely nothing to do with "The Book of Mormon" (neither the prayer book nor the immensely popular musical), apart from cadging a ride on its coattails. That said, Avenue Theater's "The Book of Moron," Robert Dubac's one-man show about Bob, a brain-injured patient struggling to recover his memory of himself, is a terrific show in its own right, witty and incisive. At times, it's almost like a TED talk. There is lean-faced Dubac, cheekbones sharp as his humor, describing his peculiar situation. Click Here to read the rest of the review...