Author: Joe Kellerman

Apr. 13 - May. 27 This musical comedy hit is loaded with big laughs, colorful characters and the songs that made the '20s roar!  Based on the screenplay of the acclaimed 1994 film by Woody Allen and Douglas McGrath, this six-time Tony-nominated musical features hit songs from the 1920s! Music/Lyrics by Various Directed by John Ashton Recommended for audiences aged 17 and up. Please call the box office at 303.856.7830 to purchase....

Mar. 30 - May. 13 For sixty years, Queen Elizabeth II has met with each of her twelve Prime Ministers in a private weekly audience. The discussions are utterly secret, even to the royal and ministerial spouses. Peter Morgan imagines these meetings over the decades of the Queen’s remarkable reign, through Prime Ministers from Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher to David Cameron. From the creator of the Netflix Original Series, The Crown. By Peter Morgan. Directed by Bernie Cardell. Please call the box office at 303.856.7830 to purchase....

“Sleuth - Brandon Palmer and Mark Rubald” (Provided by RDG Photography) In 1971 SLEUTH received the Tony Award for Best Play. The following year playwright Anthony Shaffer adapted his play for a film, which starred Laurence Olivier and Michael Caine. According to Shaffer, the play had been partially inspired by his friend, Stephen Sondheim, who loved playing games. Shaffer sets this thriller in Andrew Wyke’s Wiltshire manor house. Wyke, who is a huge success as mystery writer, has created a home which reflects his obsessions with the deceptive inventions of fiction and game-playing. The author invites his wife’s lover, Milo Tindle, to come over to his home, and coerces him to stage a robbery. The chain of events which then spiral out of control leave us as audience to decide where imagination ends and reality begins. In this critic’s not so humble opinion this cat and mouse game is written with such delightful skill and wit it’s impossible not to get swept away by it. The acting stuns! Mark Rubald’s whirlwind reading of the part of Andrew Wyke is breathtaking in its shifts of accent and persona. Brandon Palmer’s Tindle, who struggles to keep up with the quicksilver nature of Wyke’s imagination, is the perfect foil. All of Bernie Cardell’s magical directorial instincts are at work here allowing playwright Shaffer’s world of mystery and mayhem to do its work magnificently. Alex Polzin’s beautifully appointed set design is an astonishing work of art. The wrap-around nature of Polzin's design is full of character-defining detail that allows Wyke’s home to become a character all unto itself. The costumes by Susan Rahmsdorff-Terry and lighting by Vance Mackenzie enhance the production.   By David Marlowe "Marlowe's Musings" - February 5, 2018 Original Review ...

“Sleuth - Mark Rubald and Brandon Palmer” (Provided by RDG Photography) Anthony Shaffer's Sleuth is one of those thrillers where the less said about the plot, the better.  Vintage Theatre and Lowry's Spotlight Theater's whimsical, maniacal production is so good, I don't want to spoil a thing. Suffice to say, that even with a lesser script, this exceptional cast and brilliant director could wring out a must-see show. Wealthy and successful mystery writer Andrew Wyke (Mark Rubald) invites his wife’s lover  Milo Tindle (Brandon Palmer) to his country estate, where their battle of wits quickly turns sinister. The two play an often hilarious, abruptly menacing, and ultimately deadly game of cat-and-mouse, as they seek to turn the tables on one another and walk away with an ephemeral prize. The dialogue is loaded with irony and double entendres. It's disconcerting to hear jokes originating from anger, jealousy, and contempt, and laughing anyway. Oneupsmanship is the order of the day, and yet Rubald and Palmer have such a rapport and are so generous in their performances, it's almost as if the actors are working against their own characters to boost the others' mastery of the game. Wyke begins with the home-court advantage, but Tindle rises to the challenge. Rubald gives a tour de force performance as the seasoned game-player, with malice aforethought. Palmer bides his time and ends up giving as good as he gets. It's all deliciously wicked fun, with inevitably lethal consequences. The show has so many twists and turns, the term "Sleuth virgin" has been coined as a way of distinguishing those "in the know" from those who have yet to experience the myriad surprises. This is my third time seeing Sleuth, and it's easily my favorite, beating out even the Laurence Olivier/Michael Caine 1972 film version. Kudos to director Bernie Cardell for bringing out such layered performances and pacing the show like a fencing match. Alex Polzin's set design in the Vintage Theatre's intimate space is exceptional, and I want to give special mention to whoever arranged the Hollywood-caliber special effects involving gunplay. Sleuth is about much more than two men butting heads over a patently unworthy trophy woman. It raises questions about racism, class bias, and even the worthiness of mystery fiction. The facts, Tindle warns Wyke, are never as tidy as the fiction. In Sleuth, no one is truly innocent, and the reality of revenge isn't nearly so much fun as the seeking.   By Patrick Dorn - February 5, 2018 Original Review ...