Reviews

By Courtney Drake-McDonough For the Lowry News We like to think we go through life making the right choices, opting for telling the truth over lying. But sometimes we choose to lie and sometimes lies fall in our laps and we have to decide what to do with them. Is a lie always bad? Is the truth always good? These are the questions swirling around between the four characters in Lobby Hero plaything through July 6 at the Vintage Theatre. The four character’s lives intertwine with allegiances constantly shifting like soft sand. And like soft sand, no one is ever really on solid ground. CLICK HERE to read the rest of the review  ...

Review: 3 stars out of 4From the Denver Post Review by Claire Martin "Grey Gardens" is surprisingly merry for a story about a couple of aging recluses who, by their initial description, lived in squalor more reminiscent of "Hoarders: Buried Alive!" than the genteel "reduced circumstances" that polite society preferred. Click Here for the full review...

Grey Gardens review by David Marlowe In 2007 “Grey Gardens” was nominated for 10 Tony Awards and received three. It also got the Obie Award, The Louise Lortei Award and twelve Drama Desk Awards. Vintage Theatre produced the musical at their previous location on Seventeenth Avenue with great success. Now at their new Aurora location on Dayton they’ve done it again! This time it’s better than ever! CLICK HERE to read the full review...

Review by Beki Pineda: Two women waiting outside a church begin to talk and discover that they have things in common. Helen Richards (Lisa Young) is revisiting a woman she met as a child. Zora Evans (Davida A. Terrell) is trying to get a gig with NPR and is there to do interviews with the waiting people. They are joined by street artist, Mona Lisa Martin (Josephine Lemon-Lett) who is a Katrina survivor. Next comes Keisha Cameron (Ilasiea Gray), a saucy teenager pushing her faux baby in a stroller, foreshadowing her reason for being there. The last arrival is a quiet guarded female soldier, Gwendolyn Johnson (ShaShauna Staton). They have all gathered outside the Ebenezer Baptist Church to pay homage to recently deceased Civil Rights leader Coretta Scott King, the widow of Martin Luther King, Jr. The conversations reveal each woman's connection to Mrs. King and moves along leisurely until Keisha arrives. An unlikely candidate for being in this line, she startles with her reason for being there. This is followed by a dialogue duet between the street artist and the Afghanistan-bound soldier. In a touching back-and-forth, they tell their horrific tales of survival. This would be a powerful evening even without the occasion for the gathering, but each woman's emotional connection to Mrs. King pulls the whole piece together. The individual performances are strong; as an ensemble, they shine! A WOW Factor of 8! ...