Reviews

Review by Dave Perry, Aurora Sentinel After more than a generation of sound sleep, regional theaters across the country are bringing the musical story of American comedy icon Fanny Brice back to life. And the life of one of the country’s most endearing, albeit not enduring, comediennes is filling up almost all the boards of Aurora’s Vintage Theatre. Few people these days know much about Brice, although almost everyone alive in the 1960s can sing practically every word of at least two of the classic songs from the musical about Brice’s amazing life. “People” (who need people) and “Don’t Rain on My Parade” are foundations of the American musical lexicon. Far fewer recall or ever heard of Baby Snooks, a radio comedy show once as prominent as “Everybody Loves Raymond,” and faded for most of America, just about as fast. For most of us, the now-obscure play is all about Barbara Streisand as Brice in the movie version of “Funny Girl.” And that’s how the Vintage “Funny Girl” comes off. Continue Reading...

By Patrick Dorn Tom Mula’s masterful, magical, metaphysical take on Dickens’ A Christmas Carol is rich in language, ideas, emotion, and hope for the redeemable human spirit. It’s too bad Ebenezer Scrooge’s wretched and equally greedy partner has to die to realize it. ...

By David Marlowe, Marlowe's Musings A few months ago a dear friend who has produced countless musicals told me it was utterly ridiculous to think that anyone could successfully produce “Funny Girl.” He had tried and failed. His contention was that Barbra Streisand had made such an indelible mark with her characterization of Fanny Brice that no actress could ever approach the role and no director could ever create a successful production. Director Robert Michael Sanders' casting of Lauren Cora Marsh proves him wrong! ...

Review by Claire Martin, The Denver Post3.5 (out of 4) stars! Vintage Theatre's production of Marsha Norman's "'Night, Mother" is compelling, intelligent and, for a story about impending suicide, surprisingly witty. Mother Thelma Cates (Emma Messenger) introduces herself by comically waggling her ample behind to "Yakety Yak" as she putters in the kitchen, looking for a snack. She complains aloud that they're out of Snoballs and Hershey's kisses, launching into a nearly nonstop commentary about whatever pops into her mind. Continue reading...