Reviews

Review by David Marlowe Marlowe's Musings “Other Desert Cities” Is a Pulitzer Prize nominated drama with a deliciously unpredictable script.  Playwright Jon Robin Baitz has done a masterful job of penning a script that makes audiences do a complete reversal of their preliminary vision of his characters in Act Two.      After being gone for six years, Brooke Wyeth returns to her parents’ home in Palm Springs, California with her new novel in hand. It’s Christmas and Brooke announces to her parents that she’s about to publish “a memoir” describing a tragic event in the family’s past that opens a deep emotional wound.      Molly Killoran portrays Brooke Wyeth with the exact right petulant look and peevish expressions as the rebel of this dysfunctional family.      Jan Cleveland portrays Brooke’s mother, Polly, as a witty if bigoted conservative at the top of the play and later as a furious matriarch as her daughter’s unforgiving assertions intensify. Click here to continue reading...

Review by Deb FlombergAXS.com When it comes to family drama, the stage is familiar territory. There are many successful plays that capitalize on the poignancy and familiarity of troubles at home, each with it’s own unique cast of characters and deeply upsetting secrets to reveal. However, as recognizable as the family troubles in “Other Desert Cities” may seem at first glance, it’s actually a surprisingly resonant, deeply felt production featuring a fine ensemble of truly talented actors. It’s a perfect fit for the smaller, intimate black box space at Vintage Theatre, and you can catch this impressive production through March 1. To begin with, the plot of “Other Desert Cities” has quite a few secrets to reveal, much like any family gathering where too much alcohol is served. The story centers on the Wyeth family – Lyman and Polly are the parental figures, while Brooke and Trip are their two grown children, each visiting for Christmas from their respective homes in New York and Los Angeles. Also in the home is Polly’s sister, Silda, a recovering alcoholic depending on her sister’s family for support and care. Click here to continue reading...

Review by Claire Martin Denver Post 3 stars (out of 4!) "Other Desert Cities," at Vintage Theatre, takes its vague name from California highway signs — "To Palm Springs" reads an exit sign, and another directs drivers to the dry promise of "Other Desert Cities." And desert cities, of course, are man-made mirages, with lawns, pools and buildings on land once home to tumbleweed and cacti. So this play, set in Palm Springs, promises an illusion, and boy, does it deliver. Set on Christmas Eve 2004, the play opens with New Yorker Brooke Wyeth (Molly Killoran) arriving home for the first time in six years. She's full of East Coast attitude and more than a little entitlement. Click Here to continue reading...

By Claudia Carbonne Less than two weeks after the opera Madame Butterfly closed at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House in Denver, a similar story, Miss Saigon, opened to a sellout crowd at the Vintage Theatre in Aurora, Colorado. The tragic tale of an Asian woman loved and left by an American soldier is now etched in our minds after both performances. In the Vintage Theatre’s production, the company does an admirable job in bringing the big, bold Vietnam War love story to its small stage of the Jeffrey Nickelson Auditorium. The desperate searching for love, the sleazy nightclubs, the cruelty of war, the heartbreak, the parades, the ultimate sacrifice of a mother for her child. . .it’s all there. A video of half-American children, “living reminders” who were “born in strife, conceived in hell” added a poignant touch to the already emotionally charged story based on true events in which theatergoers in the small theatre can’t help becoming intimately engaged. Click here for the full review....